Krehbiel, Cole

Geospatial Analyst
Email: 
cole.krehbiel@sdstate.edu
Education: 
 2015           M.S. in Geography, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD                                                                                                                2013           B.A. in Spanish, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD                                                                                                                    2013           B.S. in Geographic Information Sciences, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD                                                                               2013           B.S. in Geography, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Resume_ColeKrehbiel_05FEB.pdf                   CV_ColeKrehbiel_10FEB.pdf  
Research Interests: 
urban remote sensing, land cover/land use change, the middle infrared spectral region, land surface phenology, urban heat islands, spatio-temporal analysis, applications of GIS and remote sensing for meteorology, urban planning, and agriculture
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I graduated from South Dakota State University with degrees in Spanish (B.A.), Geography (B.S.), and Geographic Information Sciences (B.S.) in 2013. In 2015 I completed my graduate degree (M.S.) in the department of Geography. My thesis used ten year time series of (1) the Web-Enabled Landsat Data (WELD) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) product and MODIS Land Surface Temperature data to model urban land surface phenology in order to analyze the impacts of urban areas and urban heat islands on the seasonal development of the vegetated land surface on an urban-rural gradient for 19 urban areas located in the Upper Midwest region of the United States.

I started working for the Geospatial Sciences Center of Excellence as a Center Scholar, a research experience for undergraduates program. I worked on a study of the seasonal and view angle effects of middle infrared (MIR) radiance in relation to urban remote sensing. I presented my findings at the Joint Urban Remote Sensing Event (JURSE13) in São Paulo, Brazil, where my study was published in the conference proceedings (see below). My study, entitled, “Exploring the middle infrared region for urban remote sensing: seasonal and view angle effects” was published in Remote Sensing Letters in November 2013 (see below). The goal of the study is to investigate the dynamics of mid-infrared radiance by examining the effects of seasonality, impervious surface area, and sensor view zenith angle on observed radiance in the 3 to 5 µm range.

I worked at the Geospatial Sciences Center of Excellence as a Graduate Research Assistant from 2014-2015. During this time I worked on a project that investigated the impacts of urban areas on urban phenology utilizing NDVI-derived land surface phenology metrics. I presented my findings at the Joint Urban Remote Sensing Event (JURSE2015) in Lausanne, Switzerland, where my study, titled, "Using Web-enabled Landsat Data time series to analyze the impacts of urban areas on remotely sensed vegetation dynamics" was published in the conference proceedings (see below).The study was accepted for publication in the IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing in October 2015 (see below). I worked on another project that used multiple datasets of past and future projections of urban growth over the Great Plains of the United States to analyze urban scaling relationships between total area, population, and economic variables. I also worked on a project that demonstrates the ability of the MIR to penetrate PM2.5 atmospheric aerosol pollution over cities in Eastern China.

I currently work at the Geospatial Sciences Center of Excellence as a geospatial analyst on multiple NASA-funded projects. Some of my current work includes analysis of multiple datasets of past and future projections of urban areas over the conterminous United States to analyze urban scaling relationships between total area, population, and economic variables. The project also investigates the evolution of cities between 2001-2100. I will present these findings at the 2015 AGU Fall Meeting. I am also working on another project that observes urban heat islands and the thermal regime over cities in the Upper Midwest of the United States using MODIS Land Surface Temperature data.





Last modified: 
Apr 22, 2016